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FASHION WEEKS Report SS19



Missoni SS19

The beginning of a new fashion month is a good enough reason to celebrate, but the creative directors behind the latest spring/summer collections have managed to take

the word celebrate to a whole new level. Spring/summer 19 season might go down in history as a season containing the biggest number of anniversary shows, as brands

ranging from the knitwear titan, Missoni, to the reigning king of American sportswear, Ralph Lauren, celebrated their achievements by staging special runway presentations.

Mary Katrantzou was among the celebrators as well, having staged her 10th anniversary show. Katarantzou’s success and persistence just show how strong stance

on design combined with passion and love for what you do can result in a business that is both successful and sustainable.


Marc Jacobs SS19

New York has for several seasons suffered from the lack of authentic creative voices. With Marc Jacobs and Raf Simons serving as sole torchbearers, New York fashion week

almost felt like it was drowning in a sea of directionless renditions of american sportswear, but the return of two NY-bred brands brought the much needed creative reinforcement and direction. In 2017 Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez have made it clear that their move to Paris may be more like a trial than a final departure, but

it seems like the trial period is over. Golden boys have decided to head back home, a move which was expected to be a sale enhancer.

Even though we’re huge fans of Proenza Schouler, we must admit that the latest offering of the brand may not be their most impactful one. The collection was heavily influenced by menswear tailoring: boyfriend blazers and tailored vests aplenty, and had a palpable American sensibility to it. After two seasons of designing demi couture, the boys went back to basics, using humbler materials compared to their recent offerings. Feathers and embroidery were swapped with cotton and denim, a choice perhaps influenced by the willingness to reconnect to the “real women” and their everyday wardrobe.

Mulleavy sisters are another dynamic duo that has been welcomed back to New York with open arms. The sisters headed back to the motherland with a knockout collection.

Rodarte took the attendees to the New York Marble cemetary, a rather haunting backdrop for a spring summer runway show, but as the rain started pouring the

drama had been kicked up a notch. The clothes haven’t disappointed either, the designers upped the ante on tulle and embellishments, sending out a hit after hit, offering their own whimsical and romantic take on formal and red carpet dressing.


Burberry SS19

As London fashion week was getting closer and closer, the anticipation for the Ricardo Tisci’s impending debut for Burberry has hit an all time high. He had all eyes on him and it comes as no surprise as big house shake-ups are a rarity on the British fashion scene. The huge 134-looks collection was sectioned into a refined and streamlined first section, youthful and more relaxed second one and several evening wear looks.

Many times in recent fashion history, sophomore collections have been wildly different from the debut ones, so we will refrain for commenting whether Ricardo is a good fit for the brand or not, but we will eagerly keep the eyes peeled for whatever he brings next to the table.


Prada SS19

Milan fashion week schedule has taken a serious blow as both Gucci and Bottega Veneta have decided to opt out of presenting this season.

Bottega Veneta have decided to skip the show to give newly appointed creative director Daniel Lee some time to adapt and Gucci has decided to stage their latest runway show in Paris, at Le Palace. But Milanese designers have exceeded all the expectations and more than made up for the departure of aforementioned brands. The

absolute highlight of the week if not the whole season was Miuccia Prada’s latest offering. The beauty look, by superstar team Guido Palau and Pat McGrath was amazing:

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All images courtesy of Vogue

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